Tag Archives: The Oracle of Stamboul

Bookish Istanbul

Took a little break from blogging. On Friday, I spent a few hours with a friend, discussing our nascent business opportunity and touring the Alderwood/Mimico landscape of her childhood (and first novel.) On Saturday, Zouheir and I kinda lazed around, attempting to get over the jetlag and digestive disruption that are still present after our return from Istanbul. We also took a trip out to the consignment fabulousness that is The Singing Lady to look at a couple of round tables for our study.

Today, I spent most of the morning organizing my outstanding TIFF schedule, namely, queueing online for tickets to the Jason Reitman Live Reading of Boogie Nights, and preparing my list for placing my Daytime Ticket Package order tomorrow morning.

But back to Istanbul.

In most European cities where English is not the first language, you can get by with basic English and some hand-waving. I was a little surprised to find that, in Istanbul, very few service workers seemed to speak any English.  I ascertained from Turkish friends that students learn English in school, but typically not from particularly well-qualified teachers. So in was lovely to run across some English bookstores.

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At Galeri Kayseri, the charming young shopkeepers were excellent salesmen. One noted me browsing a series of mysteries set in Istanbul (Barbara Nadel’s Inspector Ikmen Mysteries) and quickly pulled out the first of the set, Belshazzar’s Daughter. The other fellow grabbed a copy of The Janissary Tree by Jason Goodwin, saying that I might enjoy a historical mystery. Finally, as I was at the cash, the first guy hands me a copy of Portrait of a Turkish Family by Irfan Orga, exclaiming that customers had emailed them to rave about this autobiography. It had been blurbed by Harold Nicolson and Sir John Betjeman, so I kind of HAD to buy it. As I finally protested that I could not possibly buy a large coffee table book on Istanbul, he took my credit card and while it was processing, asked me “Are you a teacher?” I replied, “No, I just like to read.” He grinned back at me.

The other bookish outing was a trip to the Book Bazaar. Adjacent to the Grand Bazaar near the Beyazit metro station, vendors have new and used books, antique and reproduction prints, and other paper items.

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I picked up a novella by Orhan Pamuk (The White Castle) and a print that humoured me.

The one other bookish purchase I made was after the visit to the Topkapi Palace, the home of the Sultans for more than 400 years up to the time of the move to Dolmabahçe Palace in 1856. In particular, I was rather intrigued by the harem (family living quarters) and picked up the exhibition catalogue which had been reduced from 100 TL to 25 TL ($13) at the museum shop.


In preparation for my trip, I picked up a couple of novels set in Turkey. Before we left, I read The Oracle of Stamboul by Michael Lukas. Set during the tenure of Sultan Abdul Hamid II (late 19th century), it’s the story of a young Jewish girl from Constantia (on the Black Sea in what is now Romania) who travels to Istanbul with her father and discovers that she has a special gift. A charming novel of magical realism, it served as an excellent introduction to the period.


I’m currently finishing up The Flea Palace by contemporary Turkish author Elif Shafak. Each chapter, some of the very short, are all titled with the flat number and names of a family living at the Bonbon Palace, a rather run-down apartment building in modern Istanbul. Their stories intertwine as they seek a solution to a common problem: people dumping garbage in their garden. We learn their stories, what has brought them to Istanbul and to their current circumstances. She is an important voice in modern Turkey and I will certainly read more of her oeuvre.

Reading update

Courtesy: thegraphicsfairy.com

What a beautiful long weekend we’re having in Toronto! My younger son and husband were off to Montreal to move the former into his new-to-him apartment. So it’s been relaxing with plenty of time to read.

In Audio

I listened to Fay Weldon’s Habits of the House. My Goodreads review:

This novel set in an upper-class British household in 1899 has it all: love, lust, financial problems, socialist daughter, philandering men, loud Americans, upstairs-downstairs issues. Full of humour and commentary on the mores and habits of the time, Weldon has produced an fast-paced tale that will appeal to anyone who enjoys period literature. Bonus: it’s the first of a trilogy entitled “Love and Inheritance”. I will definitely pick up subsequent books in the series.

I’m currently finishing up an audio version of the wonderful Miriam Toews‘ novel The Flying Troutmans. In this tale, teen and pre-teen siblings Jordan and Thebes are cared for by their aunt, who has been estranged from the family, while their mother is ill. A cross-continent road-trip ensues. Toews is such a star at dialog, and to my ear, gets the banter just right.

Reading

I very much enjoyed Fitzgerald’s Tender is the Night, which I picked up to read for a Goodreads challenge. This is exactly what I like about these sorts of things: participants were charged with reading two books set in the Dirty 30s and so I downloaded this one onto my Kobo. Next up in this part of the challenge will be The Grapes of Wrath.

Another challenge was to read a book set in a country that is predominantly Muslim, so in preparation for our upcoming trip to Turkey, I downloaded The Oracle of Stamboul by Michael  Lukas. Set in 1877 in Constanta (now in Romania) and Istanbul, it’s the story of a young girl with a special gift. Saying much more would require spoilers, but suffice it to say that this is a very enjoyable, quick read.

Currently, I’m simply mad about Nell Freudenberger’s The Newlyweds. An American man meets a Bengali woman online, they marry, and she moves to Rochester NY. Written in the voice of the bride, Amina, it’s quick paced, funny, and poignant.  Hard to put down. I’m about a third of the way in and will likely finish it up today.

So that’s my reading life.

*Bathing Beauty image courtesy of The Graphics Fairy.