Tag Archives: F. Scott Fitzgerald

Reading update

Courtesy: thegraphicsfairy.com

What a beautiful long weekend we’re having in Toronto! My younger son and husband were off to Montreal to move the former into his new-to-him apartment. So it’s been relaxing with plenty of time to read.

In Audio

I listened to Fay Weldon’s Habits of the House. My Goodreads review:

This novel set in an upper-class British household in 1899 has it all: love, lust, financial problems, socialist daughter, philandering men, loud Americans, upstairs-downstairs issues. Full of humour and commentary on the mores and habits of the time, Weldon has produced an fast-paced tale that will appeal to anyone who enjoys period literature. Bonus: it’s the first of a trilogy entitled “Love and Inheritance”. I will definitely pick up subsequent books in the series.

I’m currently finishing up an audio version of the wonderful Miriam Toews‘ novel The Flying Troutmans. In this tale, teen and pre-teen siblings Jordan and Thebes are cared for by their aunt, who has been estranged from the family, while their mother is ill. A cross-continent road-trip ensues. Toews is such a star at dialog, and to my ear, gets the banter just right.

Reading

I very much enjoyed Fitzgerald’s Tender is the Night, which I picked up to read for a Goodreads challenge. This is exactly what I like about these sorts of things: participants were charged with reading two books set in the Dirty 30s and so I downloaded this one onto my Kobo. Next up in this part of the challenge will be The Grapes of Wrath.

Another challenge was to read a book set in a country that is predominantly Muslim, so in preparation for our upcoming trip to Turkey, I downloaded The Oracle of Stamboul by Michael  Lukas. Set in 1877 in Constanta (now in Romania) and Istanbul, it’s the story of a young girl with a special gift. Saying much more would require spoilers, but suffice it to say that this is a very enjoyable, quick read.

Currently, I’m simply mad about Nell Freudenberger’s The Newlyweds. An American man meets a Bengali woman online, they marry, and she moves to Rochester NY. Written in the voice of the bride, Amina, it’s quick paced, funny, and poignant.  Hard to put down. I’m about a third of the way in and will likely finish it up today.

So that’s my reading life.

*Bathing Beauty image courtesy of The Graphics Fairy.

It’s Monday…what am I reading?

it's monday

It’s been a slow reading week. I was set back by losing my Kobo for a few days. (I found it stuck between my quilt and the footboard of my bed….serves me right for, ahem, not making my bed very vigorously.) The heat made me sleepy and I kept drifting off while reading. But we’re back to normal summer temps and the words are flying by.

In paper:
I read the most wonderful graphic novel, Habibi, by Craig Thompson, author of Blankets. It’s been on my shelf for months, but I just got to it this week. There is a website for the book where you can see images and explore his process of drawing. Here’s my review from Goodreads:

A masterful work of art and storytelling, it is ultimately about the power of love to overcome hardship. I will not soon forget Zam and Dodola. It is as if I have been privy to the secrets of their lives in a fictional area of Mesopotamia. Thompson mixes the ancient world with the present day, stories from the Quran and the Bible, and the earthiness and sensuality of the lives he depicts. His arabic calligraphy is beautiful, and I regret that I didn’t realise there were notes to some of the pages with translation and source information at the end of the book, until I was about halfway through.

I was sad as I reached the end. I wanted to know more about their lives after the last page.

Highly recommended. 5 out of 5 stars

I’m starting Alif the Unseen next, another fantasy set in a mythical Arabian nation. I picked it up at the Random House Warehouse Sale in the spring.

On my eReader:

Now that I’ve recovered my Kobo, I’ll be continuing with Tender Is the Night by F. Scott Fitzgerald. Next up will be The Snow Child by Eowyn Ivey. It’s a fantasy set in Alaska in the 1920s, where childless homesteaders build a child out of snow.

In audio:

I’ve just about finished Haruki Murakami’s short story collection The Elephant Vanishes. It’s a wonderful set of stories, some more fantastical than others. For a complete change of pace, I’ll be listening to Fay Weldon’s Habits Of The House next.

I’m off to Stratford tomorrow with some friends to see Mary Stuart. I”m in charge of the picnic lunch so I’m off to prep before bed tonight. Back on Wednesday!

Mary Stuart | On the Stage
Seana McKenna (centre) as Elizabeth surrounded by, from left: Peter Hutt as Aubespine, Dylan Trowbridge as William Davison, Brian Dennehy as the Earl of Shrewsbury and Geraint Wyn Davies as the Earl of Leicester in Mary Stuart. Photo by David Hou.